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Key notes for Injury Prevention

December 12, 2017

The best practice for preventing injury is general physical preparedness. General physical preparedness training is the first concept to understand when talking about injury prevention, especially for trauma. It means maintaining a baseline of fitness so that you can respond to physical challenges without harm. Getting hurt sucks. Sprains, strains, tendonitis, and even broken bones are all consequences of living an active and athletic lifestyle. Luckily, with the right knowledge and preparation, many injuries can be diminished or entirely prevented.

 

There are two classes of injuries: traumatic and cumulative.

 

Traumatic injuries are those accidents that happen in sport or daily life, such as rolling your ankle on a trail run or crashing your bike on the morning commute. Cumulative injuries (Over Use) relate to tissue damage that occurs over time as a result of repetitive strain. These types of injuries creep up and may be a function of poor posture, faulty movement patterns, or improper training.

 

 

Know your trouble spots

 

Tailor your workout for problem areas. For example, if you have arthritis in your knees, you'll want to build up strength. But don't do exercises that hurt. Check with your doctor. And be sure to start out lightly.

 

Listen to your body

 

The "no pain, no gain" philosophy can set you up for an injury. You can get fit without feeling pain. Don't push yourself to the point of pain. If you feel pain, you may be injured. Stop your workout, and rest for a day.

 

Fuel your body

 

Drink plenty of water before, during, and after you work out. Get off to a good start by drinking about 500 to 600 ml of water about 2 or 3 hours before exercising. A good general rule is to then drink this amount of water:

  • 200 – 300 ml about 20 to 30 minutes before working out

  • 200 – 300 ml every 10 to 20 minutes during your workout

  • 200 – 300 ml within a half hour of when your workout is done

Get the right gear

 

Buy a pair of sturdy, comfortable footwear that provide good arch support and have a cushioned heel to absorb shock. Wear loose, comfortable clothing that gives you room to move and breathe

 

Warm-up and cool-down. 

 

Every workout should begin with a warm-up and end with a cool-down period. A warm-up helps your body get ready for exercise. It gradually increases your heart rate and loosens your muscles and joints. Some ways to warm up:

  • Ride an exercise bike

  • Jog in place for 5 to 10 minutes

A cool-down after you work out is important to slowly bring your heart rate back to normal. Walking for 5 to 10 minutes after you work out is one way to cool down.

 

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